Three-D Issue 18: Reform(ation): Media & Higher Education

Einar Thorsen
Bournemouth University

With Rupert Murdoch appearing at the Leveson inquiry and Jeremy Hunt’s days seemingly numbered, this issue of Three-D again focusses on media reform. Des Freedman offers a lively critique of The Sun and Murdoch, with a call for a radical rethink of media power and regulation. Damian Tambini also explores media regulation, taking issue with market fundamentalism and outlining policy issues that needs to be addressed. MeCCSA members are actively contributing to public debate and the Coordinating Committee for Media Reform is organising a Rally for Media Reform in London on 17th May.

In Higher Education the effects of the ConDem Government cuts are already becoming apparent, with HEFCE recently estimating there will be around 10,900 fewer student places across the country next academic year. It should come as no surprise that the universities suffering the worst are reportedly the ones who have done the most for widening participation (the Russel Group on the other hand, are set to expand student numbers). Moreover, the arts and humanities are among the first courses to be “deleted”, as Gholam Khiabany explains. Whilst the managerial discourse of “student experience”, according to John Brissenden, has the potential to divide staff and students if not resisted.

For the first time this issue of Three-D contains a practice based contribution in the form of Jackey Reuben’s satire about the effects of marketing in a University.This issue also contains perspectives from abroad, with Gavan Titley exploring funding cuts in Ireland and Marcela Ganea discussing internationalisation in Romanian HE.

Finally, this issue focusses on the MeCCSA Annual Conferences, the success and innovation within our discipline and the work of the MeCCSA networks.

If you would like to write for or advertise in the next edition of Three-D, please get in touch with me on ethorsen@bmth.ac.uk by 14 September 2012. Suggestions for our website are also welcome.

Posted by Einar Thorsen